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gradnessmadness:

“Excellence is never an accident. It is always the result of high intention, sincere effort, and intelligent execution; it represents the wise choice of many alternatives - choice, not chance, determines your destiny.”

 - Aristotle

nprbooks:

americanlibraryassoc:

"I felt as if I would soon be transported to a magical land, able to read books that would carry me to places I was never able to go. It was a thrill. And that was the beginning of a lifelong experience of not only loving libraries, but living in libraries." - Doris Kearns Goodwin on her love of libraries

It’s funny, even though we’re drowning in books here at the office, I just recently got a library card for the first time in ages. And there is nothing like that thrill, that, sense of possibility: any place you want to go is contained in this quiet, brown-papery-smelling building, and it’s all absolutely free. Hooray for libraries!

— Petra

bibliolectors:

Summer Night: music and reading under the stars / Noche de verano: música y lectura bajo las estrellas (ilustración de Silvia Sponza)

bibliolectors:

Summer Night: music and reading under the stars / Noche de verano: música y lectura bajo las estrellas (ilustración de Silvia Sponza)

huffpostbooks:

War is much in the news these days, to the great distress of the world. There is not a continent on Earth on which some form of violence is expressing our species capacity for hatred and cruelty. What did Henry Miller think of war and how it could be avoided?

Miller regarded war as the ultimate expression of anti-life. In the midst of World War Two, at the urging of his devoted follower Bern Porter, Miller wrote a pamphlet titledMurder the Murderer that set forth his position. Not surprisingly, Miller’s views on war reflect his belief in the inviolability of the individual human conscience, and his condemnation of mass movements. War results because men surrender their individuality to the will of the herd⎯a herd that is manipulated to pursue the interests of a privileged few.

Read On…

uispeccoll:

Fun from our Instagram librarian Lindsay: By request she weighed our heaviest book and found that it weighs 70 pounds! You may have seen this famous book on the internet - Poetry City Marathon by Dave Morice. Morice wrote a record-breaking 10,119 pages in 100 days. Our Preservation Department also took on the task of binding this book! [xfPS3563 O87164 P647 2010] #uiowa #specialcollections #libraries #poetry #worldrecord #heaviestbook #bookbindings #extremebinding #cityofliterature #uispeccollrequests #2010

uispeccoll:

Fun from our Instagram librarian Lindsay: By request she weighed our heaviest book and found that it weighs 70 pounds! You may have seen this famous book on the internet - Poetry City Marathon by Dave Morice. Morice wrote a record-breaking 10,119 pages in 100 days. Our Preservation Department also took on the task of binding this book! [xfPS3563 O87164 P647 2010] #uiowa #specialcollections #libraries #poetry #worldrecord #heaviestbook #bookbindings #extremebinding #cityofliterature #uispeccollrequests #2010

bibliolectors:

A summer full of shared readings / Un verano lleno de lecturas compartidas (ilustración de Marie-Louise Gay)

bibliolectors:

A summer full of shared readings / Un verano lleno de lecturas compartidas (ilustración de Marie-Louise Gay)

oupacademic:

“It’s clear from even a quick inspection that there are national differences in the use of “sorry” and other words, but exactly what’s going on is harder to tell,” said Edwin Battistella, a linguist at Southern Oregon University whose new book, Sorry About That: The Language of Public Apology, describes the linguistic, philosophical and anthropological differences between saying “I’m sorry” and truly apologizing.

safx:

“Mainstream doctors are turned off by geriatrics, and that’s because they do not have the faculties to cope with the Old Crock,” Felix Silverstone, the geriatrician, explained to me. “The Old Crock is deaf. The Old Crock has poor vision. The Old Crock’s memory might be somewhat impaired. With the Old Crock, you have to slow down, because he asks you to repeat what you are saying or asking. And the Old Crock doesn’t just have a chief complaint—the Old Crock has fifteen chief complaints. How in the world are you going to cope with all of them? You’re overwhelmed. Besides, he’s had a number of these things for fifty years or so. You’re not going to cure something he’s had for fifty years. He has high blood pressure. He has diabetes. He has arthritis. There’s nothing glamorous about taking care of any of those things.”