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uispeccoll:

Fun from our Instagram librarian Lindsay: By request she weighed our heaviest book and found that it weighs 70 pounds! You may have seen this famous book on the internet - Poetry City Marathon by Dave Morice. Morice wrote a record-breaking 10,119 pages in 100 days. Our Preservation Department also took on the task of binding this book! [xfPS3563 O87164 P647 2010] #uiowa #specialcollections #libraries #poetry #worldrecord #heaviestbook #bookbindings #extremebinding #cityofliterature #uispeccollrequests #2010

uispeccoll:

Fun from our Instagram librarian Lindsay: By request she weighed our heaviest book and found that it weighs 70 pounds! You may have seen this famous book on the internet - Poetry City Marathon by Dave Morice. Morice wrote a record-breaking 10,119 pages in 100 days. Our Preservation Department also took on the task of binding this book! [xfPS3563 O87164 P647 2010] #uiowa #specialcollections #libraries #poetry #worldrecord #heaviestbook #bookbindings #extremebinding #cityofliterature #uispeccollrequests #2010

bibliolectors:

A summer full of shared readings / Un verano lleno de lecturas compartidas (ilustración de Marie-Louise Gay)

bibliolectors:

A summer full of shared readings / Un verano lleno de lecturas compartidas (ilustración de Marie-Louise Gay)

oupacademic:

“It’s clear from even a quick inspection that there are national differences in the use of “sorry” and other words, but exactly what’s going on is harder to tell,” said Edwin Battistella, a linguist at Southern Oregon University whose new book, Sorry About That: The Language of Public Apology, describes the linguistic, philosophical and anthropological differences between saying “I’m sorry” and truly apologizing.

safx:

“Mainstream doctors are turned off by geriatrics, and that’s because they do not have the faculties to cope with the Old Crock,” Felix Silverstone, the geriatrician, explained to me. “The Old Crock is deaf. The Old Crock has poor vision. The Old Crock’s memory might be somewhat impaired. With the Old Crock, you have to slow down, because he asks you to repeat what you are saying or asking. And the Old Crock doesn’t just have a chief complaint—the Old Crock has fifteen chief complaints. How in the world are you going to cope with all of them? You’re overwhelmed. Besides, he’s had a number of these things for fifty years or so. You’re not going to cure something he’s had for fifty years. He has high blood pressure. He has diabetes. He has arthritis. There’s nothing glamorous about taking care of any of those things.”

climateadaptation:

Everyone knows the climate is changing throughout the world. As the climate changes so do mankind’s living conditions - and Germany is no exception. Germany has based it’s adaptation plan on the recommendations of the UNFCCC’s IPCC 2007 report. It is implemented at the local, regional, and national levels. While it’s been slow to implement the programs, Germany’s plan serves as a model for other western states. For example, some of the bigger engineering and urban planning projects are required to take an approach that considers climate impacts over 100 years. 

See German Strategy for Adapting to Climate Change(PDF)

oupacademic:

The Battle of Alexander by Albrecht Altdorfer

His masterpiece, The Battle of Alexander, was commissioned by William IV of Bavaria and produced in 1529. It is an immense work, a gigantic grouping of men, horses and tents, with a town in the background giving way to a blue-toned landscape of sea and mountains. Each part of the composition can be taken in isolation to form autonomous scenes within the whole. Altdorfer always had a predisposition for mysterious, thick, and often sinister forests. 

From 'ALTDORFER, Albrecht' in Benezit Dictionary of Artists on Oxford Art Online. 
We’re examining inspiring landscapes this July on the Oxford Academic Tumblr. 
Image credit: The Battle of Battle of Issus (Battle of Alexander). Albrecht Altdorfer (1480–1538). Alte Pinakothek. Public domain via Wikimedia Commons. 

oupacademic:

The Battle of Alexander by Albrecht Altdorfer

His masterpiece, The Battle of Alexander, was commissioned by William IV of Bavaria and produced in 1529. It is an immense work, a gigantic grouping of men, horses and tents, with a town in the background giving way to a blue-toned landscape of sea and mountains. Each part of the composition can be taken in isolation to form autonomous scenes within the whole. Altdorfer always had a predisposition for mysterious, thick, and often sinister forests. 

From 'ALTDORFER, Albrecht' in Benezit Dictionary of Artists on Oxford Art Online

We’re examining inspiring landscapes this July on the Oxford Academic Tumblr. 

Image credit: The Battle of Battle of Issus (Battle of Alexander). Albrecht Altdorfer (1480–1538). Alte Pinakothek. Public domain via Wikimedia Commons

thejustfacts:

Apple has confirmed that it’s buying Beats Electronics for $3 billion.

thejustfacts:

Apple has confirmed that it’s buying Beats Electronics for $3 billion.

My handle is @curiousoctopus on Twitter, and the reason is that I reach out in many directions and grasp everything, bring it back and digest everything. That is what my office says about me. It says there is enthusiasm and apparent chaos, but in truth an inner order.

Paola Antonelli, interviewed by Edward Lewine in Surrounded by Great Design at MoMA, and Not Afraid to Use It

I think she’s paraphrasing Henry Mintzberg, who said of emergent strategy, 

Emergent strategy means, not chaos, but in essence unintended order.

(via stoweboyd)

oupacademic:

Have you heard these words?